Schedule

Saturday, July 16, 2011

CIVIL WAR TO CIVIL RIGHTS – A PATH TO RACIAL HEALING

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10:00 a.m. -10:20 a.m.  Welcome and Introduction of Plenary Speaker– Dr. Frank Smith
10:20 a.m. - 10:40 a.m. Dr. Sandra Jowers-Barber (Assistant Professor of History and Director   of the Oral History Project at the University of the District of Columbia)

CONFERENCE PANELS

10:40 a.m. -11:20 a.m.
The Power of Primary Sources
Participants will learn the importance of using primary sources in their teaching of the Civil War and the best ways to incorporate them into their lesson plans. They will also be given instructions on how to use the sources to engage students and encourage them to conduct independent grade appropriate research.  
Presenter: Hari Jones, Curator/ Assistant Director at the African American Civil War Museum, is a former intelligence officer in the U.S. Marine Corps and has been with the museum for seven years.  Mr. Jones is an established and noted historian on the Civil War and the United States Colored Troops.

11:30 a.m. -12:10 p.m.
Teaching the Civil War
This panel will focus on best practices and lesson plans that teachers can use in their teaching of the Civil War.  How should the contributions of African American soldiers be introduced?  How to introduce students to historical research?
Presenter: Paul LaRue, is a high school Social Studies teacher at Washington High School in Ohio.  With over 25 years experience as an educator Mr. LaRue structures a variety of hands-on experiences that make the events and people of the past more real.  Mr. LaRue has won several awards for his teaching abilities, most notably for his innovative approaches to historical education.

AFTERNOON SESSIONS

CONSECUTIVE PANELS

Lunch on your own (12:20p.m. to 1:20 p.m.)

 

1:20 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Writing African American Soldiers into the Civil War
This panel looks at specific primary sources, Black, Copper, & Bright: The District of Columbia's Black Civil War Regiment ,  and "Sketches In Color", a documentary, to use in the classroom that document and support the contributions of District of Columbia African American soldiers in the Civil War. Excerpts from "Sketches In Color" will be shown during this presentation.
Presenter: Historian Carroll C.R. Gibbs, author of Black, Copper, & Bright: The District of Columbia's Black Civil War Regiment , the first book ever written on the District's black Civil War regiment, also researched, wrote, and narrated "Sketches In Color" a 13 part companion series to the acclaimed PBS series "The Civil War" for the Howard University television station. He appeared on the History Channel in June, 2011 discussing the impact of slavery in the District of Columbia and its impact of retrocession.   

2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Gendering the Movement:  Teaching with Public History Sites
Students do not always know or understand the many contributions made by women to the Civil Rights Movement. This panel emphasizes how public history sites can be used to teach the often unsung contributions of women in the Movement.  The panelists will explore ways that public history sites can enliven the teaching of the contributions of women to the Civil Rights Movement.
Presenters: Dr. Joy Kinard is a National Park Service interpreter at Greenbelt Park, Maryland; Dr. Sandra Jowers-Barber a public historian, directs the History Program as well as the Oral History Project at the University of the District of Columbia; Mrs. Margaret Miles, is Acting Site Manager at the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House.

2:40 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
Spying and Serving: Women‘s Roles in the Civil War
There were many women who served their country during the Civil War as spies. How did they do it? What information did they convey? Have they been recognized for their efforts? Did they receive a pension? Is there any record of their service? Information will be presented on women who served their country as spies during the war.
Presenter: Hari Jones, Curator/ Assistant Director at the African American Civil War Museum.

3:20 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Descendent Research: Finding The Place For Our Family Stories in American History
The stories have been handed down for generations. Relatives believed to have fought in the Civil War or served as a spy. You’ve heard them at every family reunion.  How can you determine if they are factual or fanciful? Audrey Hinton, Lee W. Jackson, David Wellington, descendants of Civil War soldiers will explain how to get started on finding out if what you always thought about some of your relatives is really true, and they will share some of their techniques and events they have created around their discoveries.
Presenters: The presenters, all documented and certified descendants, have researched and validated the participation of their relatives in the Civil War.

4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Black Attitudes about the Civil War
How do people of color, especially African Americans feel about the Civil War? Should there be celebrations? Why and how should acknowledgements be made?  You may be surprised at the results of the presenter’s survey that looks at some of these issues.
Presenter: Professor Hermina Glass Avery, MA a public history practitioner with extensive experience in historic and cultural preservation is the Associate Director for the Study of the Civil War Era at Kennesaw State University.  She recently conducted work with the National Park Service examining African American attitudes on the Civil War.

4:40 p.m. – 5:10 p.m.
Civil War Re-enactors: Bringing Historical Actors and Events to Life
The enjoyment and historical impact of being able to experience how people of a different era dressed, decorated their houses, ate or socialized is what makes the theater of reenactment such an exciting venue.  Lovers of Civil War history experience through re-enactment and re-enactors military actions, social events and other everyday activities. Three re-enactors will discuss the why they have chosen to present history through the re-enacting of battles, displays of fashion and the reconstruction of social gatherings.
Presenters: Three re-enactors, Mel Reed, Judy Williams a member of Female RE-Enactors of Distinction (FREED), and Norm Hill have been involved in bringing an accurate portrayal of persons and military participants and events during the Civil War.

5:20 p.m. – 5:50 p.m.
The Civil Rights Movement and Its Impact
The Civil Rights Movement has been and is still being dissected to determine what lasting impact it made on America. What has changed and how has that change made a difference today?  Dr. Frank Smith, a primary source, discusses the activities and philosophy of SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) and other organizations.  Representatives of Teaching for Change, will discuss their publication Putting the Movement Back into Civil Rights Teaching, published by Teaching for Change and PRRAC.  In that publication, K-12 educators can find lessons and articles on how to teach the Civil Rights Movement effectively using a wider lens than focusing on the same central figures.
Presenters: Dr. Frank Smith, Founding Director of the African American Civil War Museum was on the front lines in Mississippi. Dr. Smith was instrumental in the establishment of the African American Civil War Memorial, during his time as a Councilman with the District of Columbia government; Teaching for Change is an organization that “encourages teachers and students to question and re-think the world inside and outside their classrooms, build a more equitable, multicultural society, and become active global citizens.”

6:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Women in the Civil Rights Movement
This panel of women activists, co-authors of the recently published Hands on the Freedom Plow; Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC, will discuss their activities in the Civil Rights Movement and their reasons for publication.
Presenter: Judy Richardson will facilitate the discussion as other co-authors explain how and why they decided to publish their stories.  A book signing will immediately follow the panel.

RECEPTION TO FOLLOW

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Sunday, July 17, 2011

Civil War to Civil Rights- a Pathway to Racial Healing

Film Festival

 

All films will be partially shown in 15 or 30 min segments and

followed by a discussion from panel presenters

 

Introduction by Dr. Frank Smith Jr.,

12:00-12:30pm Welcome and Introduction (The Power of Imagery) – Gilbert McDonald

 

12:30 pm-1:30pm
Birth of a Nation and Within Our Gates- Dr. Bernard Demczuk, Charles Jones

Directed and produced by D.W. Griffith in 1915, Birth of a Nation depicts the story of two families during the Civil War and Reconstruction era.  A huge success in the box office, this film became noted for its highly controversial portrayal of African American men (played by white actors in black face) and the Klu Klux Klan.  Birth of a Nation received widespread protest and was banned in several cities.  

Within Our Gates is a1920 silent film that highlights the racial situation in America during the violent years of Jim Crow and the Ku Klux Klan.  Directed and Produced by Oscar Micheaux, it is the oldest known surviving film made by an African American director. The film is often regarded as a response to the racism depicted in D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation.

1:30pm-2:30pm
The Negro Soldiers and Congressman Robert Smalls: a Patriots Journey from Slavery to Capitol Hill Hari Jones, and Adrena Ifill

The Negro Soldier was produced by the United States War Department in 1944, during World War Two to convince African Americans to enlist in the army and fight in the war. Released in 1944 the film was produced for African American troops, however, it was released to a broad military audience and the general public.

Congressman Robert Smalls a Patriot’s Journey from Slavery to Capitol Hill was directed by Adrena Ifill, who brings to life the story of Robert Smalls in this documentary about his courageous journey to freedom and election as one of the first African American Congressman in 1875.  Released in 2009 this film highlights the legacy and contributions of this great statesman.

3:30pm-4:30pm
Murder of Emmitt Till- Teaching For Change

This documentary was produced and directed by Stanley Nelson and depicts the story of Emmett Till, a fourteen year old boy, form Chicago, brutally murdered in 1955 Mississippi. Although his killers were arrested and charged with murder, they were both acquitted and shortly after the trial went on to provide a detailed account of how they murdered Till, to a journalist.  This poignant film chronicles the incident, the trail and the decision of Emmett’s Mother to leave the casket open at her son’s funeral.

4:30pm-5:30pm
Eyes on the Prize- Judy Richardson

This fourteen hour documentary series chronicles the scope of the African American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s. Premiering in 1987 and 1990 in a two part series, this film covers all the major events of the civil rights movement for 1954 to 1985.  Featuring interviews and primary sources, this film series records the growth of the Civil Rights movement in the United States and focuses on the ordinary people who effected the change.

5:30pm-6:30pm
Freedom Riders- Reverend Reginald Green, Dion Diamond, Joan Mulholland

This documentary, newly released May 2011, was directed by Stanley Nelson, tells the powerful and inspirational story of more than 400 black and white Americans that risked their lives by traveling together on buses and trains through the Deep South for six months in 1961.  Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws, the Freedom Riders met with bitter racism and mob violence along the way, sorely testing their belief in nonviolent activism.  This two-hour documentary features testimony from the Riders themselves.

6:30pm-7:30pm
Glory- Asa Gordon, Dr. Frank Smith, and Russell Williams

This 1989 motion picture was directed by Edward Zwick, and depicts the story of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer, an African American regiment during the Civil War.  This film is told from the point of view of Robert Gould Shaw, the commanding officer of the 54th Massachusetts, and based on the letters of Robert Gould Shaw and the novels Lay this Laurel and One Gallant Rush.

7:30pm- 8:00pm- Closing Remarks -  Tim Reid

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Monday, July 18, 2011

Civil War to Civil Rights- a Pathway to Racial Healing


Freedom Riders Reception

Ribbon Cutting, Dedication & Awards Program

African American Civil War Museum

Honorable Frank Smith, Executive Director, Presiding

Musical Prelude                                                                                 
Posting of Colors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US Color Guard, Military District of Washington
Audience Please Stand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pledge of Allegiance/Star Spangled Banner    
 Invocation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rev. Reginald Green, Board Secretary
Mayoral Greetings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Honorable Vince Gray, Mayor, DC
Greeting from Congress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Holmes Norton

Presentation for Awards

William “Bill” Lucy:  Civil Rights & Labor Leader (Retired)

Presented by Josh Williams

Honorable Mary Landrieu, D-LA

Presented by Beverly Perry, Board Chair, Civil War Memorial

Honorable Jesse Jackson, Jr., Illinois, 2nd District

Presented by Emanuel Friedman, Civil War Memorial Board Member

Hari Jones, Curator, African American Civil War Museum

Presented by Lee W. Jackson, CWM Board Member

Larry Dillard, In Memoriam

Presented by Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton

Barbara Lang, Outstanding Business Advocate

Presented by B. Doyle Mitchell, President, Industrial Bank

Sgt. Fred Johnson, Heritage Preservation Award

Presented by Malcolm Beech

Ruby Thomas, FREED Award

Presented by Patricia Tyson, President, FREED

Dion Diamond, Freedom Rider Award

Presented by Audrey Hinton, Civil War Memorial Board Member

Rev. Reginald Green, Freedom Rider Award

Presented by Jack H. Olender, Civil War Memorial Board Member

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, Freedom Rider, Freedom Rider Award

Presented by Julia Hudson, Civil War Memorial Board Member

Hank Thomas, Freedom Rider Award

Presented by Wesley Taylor, Board Member

 

Closing Remarks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dr. Frank Smith

Tours & VIP Reception

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